Plasma cutting power sources and welding machines

itaeng

DC TIG

TIG 1681 DC HF

single-phase
S00154

TIG 1681 DC HF

detail

TIG 1682 DC HF

single-phase
S00156

TIG 1682 DC HF

detail

TIG 2072 DC HF

single-phase
S00160

TIG 2072 DC HF

detail

TIG 3080 DC HF

three-phase
S00118

TIG 3080 DC HF

detail

TIG 4080 DC HF

three-phase
S00120

TIG 4080 DC HF

detail
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Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), also known as tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, is an arc welding process that, to produce the weld, uses a non consumable tungsten electrode, a shielding gas and can be realized with or without filler metal. The weld area is protected from atmospheric contamination by a shielding gas (usually an inert gas such as argon), and a filler metal is normally used, though some welds, known as autogenous welds, do not require it.
GTAW is most commonly used to weld thin sections of stainless steel and non-ferrous metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and copper alloys.
The process grants the operator greater control over the weld than competing processes such as shielded metal arc welding and gas metal arc welding, allowing for stronger, higher quality welds. However, GTAW is comparatively more complex and difficult to master, and furthermore, it is significantly slower than most other welding techniques.
To strike the welding arc, a high frequency power source provides an electric spark; this spark is a conductive path for the welding current through the shielding gas and allows the arc to be initiated. Once the arc is struck, the welder moves the torch in a small circle to create a welding pool, the size of which depends on the size of the electrode and the amount of current. While maintaining a constant separation between the electrode and the workpiece, the operator then moves the torch slightly and tilts it backward about 10–15 degrees from vertical. He must avoid that the electrode comes into direct contact with the workpiece, otherwise the tungsten electrode "sticks" to the joint and the welding is interrupted. Filler metal is added manually to the front end of the weld pool as it is needed
The equipment required for the gas tungsten arc welding operation includes a welding power source, a welding torch utilizing a non consumable tungsten electrode, a shielding gas source, a ground clamp and an eventual rod filler metal.